Avoid Becoming a Human Tranquilizer

Avoid Becoming a Human Tranquilizer

Boring drugs the audience. It automatically induces a big ol’ case of the drowsies. Transports folks directly to droolville. (And believe me, you do not want to have to hand out napkins with your presentation.) That photo was snapped during my “Tricia” story at Carrie Wilkerson’s BOSS Event. Even the guy on the cell phone is laughing. ENGAGE : Avoid Becoming a Human Tranquilizer Play Now | Play in Popup | Download Here are 5.5.5 ways to avoid becoming a human tranquilizer. (You can get even more ways in my free ENGAGE video.) #1 Be Funny. No, don’t tell jokes, just be humorous. Nothing keeps the audience engaged better than laughter and smiles. Period. You don’t have to be a comedian – you just need to be light when the moment is right. #2 Be Interactional. Include the names of people you’ve met in your talk. Use them as positive examples. Prove that the people in the seats are important to you. #3 Be Clear. No one likes a rambler. People like points. They like to be able to take notes and go home with specifics. #4 Be Fresh. Speak with an “I just discovered this” attitude. The 500th time you’ve given this speech? It’s my first time hearing it, so give me your fresh. #5 Be Passionate. Passion bleeds. It helps others, delivers results, cannot go unresolved and makes you and others better off. Speak with passion or just leave me a note. #5.5 Be Authentic. Gestures, voice, style should be the same on and off stage. #5.5.5. Be Light. Don’t take yourself so...

Public Speaking – Unbreakable Laws

Two years ago I sat captivated in an audience listening to one of the best speakers on the circuit. He almost hypnotized us with his cadence of style and charisma. Leaning toward the stage I began to study his methods in order to learn and apply some of his techniques. He seemed to possess every tool of a top presenter. Halfway through his message, however, uneasiness began to bleed over me. A couple of his illustrations were familiar. He told them in first person, but I knew the individuals to whom these accounts actually occurred. Changing few of the details he plagiarized a story in front of over two thousand attendees. Leaning back in my seat I listened to the rest of the speech. I was not nearly as impressed as before. In fact, more skeptical, because no one likes to be taken for a ride on a Ferris wheel when they thought they were boarding a roller coaster. I did learn a lot that night, but not in presentation skills. I learned that no matter how great the speaker, no amount of talent can save you from ignoring the two unbreakable laws of speaking. Unbreakable Law #1: The Law of Character Mom always taught us as kids, “Actions speak louder than words” (No, this is not an article about gestures). How we live always speaks louder than what comes from our lips. You want to trust the person speaking to you, and you want to be trustworthy when presenting. Character lends strength to your message before the first word is spoken. Before the first note is taken. Before...

5 Tips for Great Speaking

The difference in a powerful and pitiful presentation is usually a few essential basics. The following seven reminders must be part of every speech. 1. Audience Awareness. The better you know the people in the seat, the better your presentation will be. Too many speakers are self-centered. They design a message that sounds good to them. The audience-centered speaker provides what the people need. Information to help them grow. Motivation to aid the desire to apply. 2. Positive Preparation Do not prepare in fear. Forget worrying about the possibilities of what can go wrong. Instead, think about the positives. Note everything you can’t wait to share. Pinpoint the most powerful aspects of the speech and look forward to releasing them. 3. Confident Content. Too often we draw our confidence from our delivery style. Listen, that’s overrated. Who cares if an audience is wowed by delivery if no content comes with it? The less confident you are with your delivery the more critical it is that you are confident with your content. Know exactly the benefit the audience will receive from the information you share. 4. Test Technology. Check the microphones, laptop, etc. before the event. Inspect it with enough time to repair it if needed. Last Wednesday I spoke at a meeting and we were not sure if my laptop would be compatible with the projection system. In the end we switched cables and all went well. But if I hadn’t been there forty-five minutes early it might not have went as well. 5. Validate Value This ties the previous four points together. Value the audience. Remember that you are...

Common Language

  You get super close to your audience when you speak the same language. A language that may almost seem foreign to those not in the circle. Fitness for example. I used to own a gym and we’d talk about… Reps Sets Getting ripped to the gills High intensity Forced reps Drop sets   Or with online business… Autoresponder PHP Upsells Analytics Plugins   What’s the language of your audience? If you don’t know then…. #1 Buy Their Magazines Mags are current and relevant. The latest jargon and idioms are used. #2 Read Their Books Yes, this take more time, but you get to the heart of the audience. Magazines are great from a surface point of view. Books are great to increase depth perception. #3 Listen to Their Speakers These should be people from within the industry. Folks who possibly create the language. #4 Join the Masses I feel it’s easiest to write and speak to people I have a bond with. It’s much easier for me to speak to a business group than a physicians group. Business is where I spend my time. Where I invest my money and energy. So naturally it’s the place I feel most connected. When I speak to a group of business owners I do so as a fellow owner – not simply as an employed speaker. I know the language and can speak it naturally. When I share stories, examples and points using common language the audience gets that “he’s talking just to me” feeling. Which is the goal of this entire series, right? Warning: Don’t just pull some terms and...

Universal Stories

We’re more alike than you think – you and me… I watched cartoons as a kid on Saturday mornings – how about you? I remember climbing trees and my mom begging me to come down and bring a switch with me! How about you? I remember opening the cereal box from the bottom to get the prize – how about you? I remember my grandfather taking me fishing – how about you? While those may not be exactly what you have experienced I bet you had a trigger or a link to a memory. That’s the power of a universal story. Shared “like” memories that help people feel connected. We engage our audience at a deep level when they feel we are similar. And since we’re all human we are. The posts, podcasts and presentations we dislike the most are often those where the person comes across as superior. Mom always said, “Nobody likes a know it all.” In my experience, there are five ways to create a common bond through universal stories: #1 Childhood Hey! We were all kids once. And most kids were the same… Playing with toys. Riding bikes. Watching cartoons. Fantasy worlds. Children are innocent. Fun. Precocious. Honest. Alive. Stories from childhood deliver warmth and security. #2 Holidays Fireworks on the 4th. Thanksgiving turkey gone bad. And everyone seems to have a Cousin Eddie at Christmas. Or how about the family trip to Disney. You might think Disney doesn’t count since everyone has not been. But people are familiar with the images. They feel the fun even if they have not been there personally. We’re...