Avoid Becoming a Human Tranquilizer

humantranquilizer

Boring drugs the audience. It automatically induces a big ol’ case of the drowsies. Transports folks directly to droolville. (And believe me, you do not want to have to hand out napkins with your presentation.)

humantranquilizer

That photo was snapped during my “Tricia” story at Carrie Wilkerson’s BOSS Event. Even the guy on the cell phone is laughing. 🙂

Here are 5.5.5 ways to avoid becoming a human tranquilizer. (You can get even more ways in my free ENGAGE video.)

#1 Be Funny. No, don’t tell jokes, just be humorous. Nothing keeps the audience engaged better than laughter and smiles. Period. You don’t have to be a comedian – you just need to be light when the moment is right.

#2 Be Interactional. Include the names of people you’ve met in your talk. Use them as positive examples. Prove that the people in the seats are important to you.

#3 Be Clear. No one likes a rambler. People like points. They like to be able to take notes and go home with specifics.

#4 Be Fresh. Speak with an “I just discovered this” attitude. The 500th time you’ve given this speech? It’s my first time hearing it, so give me your fresh.

#5 Be Passionate. Passion bleeds. It helps others, delivers results, cannot go unresolved and makes you and others better off. Speak with passion or just leave me a note.

#5.5 Be Authentic. Gestures, voice, style should be the same on and off stage.

#5.5.5. Be Light. Don’t take yourself so serious.

pbe-speakwithpassion

Public Speaking – Unbreakable Laws

Two years ago I sat captivated in an audience listening to one of the best speakers on the circuit. He almost hypnotized us with his cadence of style and charisma. Leaning toward the stage I began to study his methods in order to learn and apply some of his techniques. He seemed to possess every tool of a top presenter.

Halfway through his message, however, uneasiness began to bleed over me. A couple of his illustrations were familiar. He told them in first person, but I knew the individuals to whom these accounts actually occurred. Changing few of the details he plagiarized a story in front of over two thousand attendees.

Leaning back in my seat I listened to the rest of the speech. I was not nearly as impressed as before. In fact, more skeptical, because no one likes to be taken for a ride on a Ferris wheel when they thought they were boarding a roller coaster. I did learn a lot that night, but not in presentation skills. I learned that no matter how great the speaker, no amount of talent can save you from ignoring the two unbreakable laws of speaking.

Unbreakable Law #1: The Law of Character

Mom always taught us as kids, “Actions speak louder than words” (No, this is not an article about gestures). How we live always speaks louder than what comes from our lips.
You want to trust the person speaking to you, and you want to be trustworthy when presenting. Character lends strength to your message before the first word is spoken. Before the first note is taken. Before the first laugh comes from the audience.

Think about it. When someone approaches the microphone you want the person to be good. Skilled. Interesting. Exciting. Magnetizing. You want to be those things as well. You want to be the best speaker or presenter that you can be. That is why you participate in Toastmasters. You know the feedback, experience, and credibility delivered from the association will catapult your communication. But…

Even more critical than the ability of the presenter, you want to know if the person is credible. If a co-worker steps to the podium to present a talk on office ethics and you know she is slipping supplies in her purse for personal use what will your response be? When you see a flyer on the bulletin board: Bill Whatshisname, speaking today on “Team Work,” but you know that he runs his company like a dictator, what happens inside of you?

W. Somerset Maugham says, “Don’t be short-changed by choosing personality over character.” Somerset is right. Isn’t “short-changed” exactly how we feel after we discover that the speaker is not all he claimed? On the other hand, when a person of character speaks we feel rich even if the presentation was not the best.

A simple test of character is revealed in the old adage, “Character is who you are when no one else is looking.” That effortless phrase contains true power. The goal is for us is to be the same person when everyone is looking as when no one is looking. Who you are cannot be separated from your message. Your spirit, character, and genuine heart will come through your words and actions.

After exiting the civic center two years ago I began thinking about the speaker’s message. I remembered the stories (even the ones out of context), but I did not remember his point. The more I reviewed, the more I realized that although over an hour was spent talking, little valuable information was shared. Only after reflecting did I notice that he broke the second law.

Unbreakable Law #2: The Law of Content.

Charisma might deliver style points to listeners, but content delivers mind points. Of course, you want to become the best communicator you can be, but remember this: A bad day on the platform with poor content will leave an unrecoverable impression. But a bad day on the platform with strong content can still leave a favorable impression.

Consider it the rule of the walk-away. The speaker I heard, though entertaining, provided no walk-away information. As you prepare, look over your presentation and ask, “What is the walk-away value of this material?” Another way to think about this is, “What will the audience remember when they get home?”

One sure way to accomplish this is to have your content so securely tied to your theme that it cannot be forgotten. Every point should reemphasize the premise of your presentation. They should support it to the point of being inseparable. If possible, the content should be so strong that the audience would feel foolish for ignoring it and leaving it at the meeting. When you see people taking notes, you know you have content, because it is impossible to take notes on nothing.

Nothing…that reminds me of that speaker again. Maybe I should look him up and thank him for making me think about what really counts in a presentation. Character and Content. Break these two laws at your own risk.

Paul Evans is the author of six books, a professional speaker, and the creator of Instant Speaking Success. Paul has helped over 35,000 speakers of all levels.

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5 Tips for Great Speaking

The difference in a powerful and pitiful presentation is usually a few essential basics. The following seven reminders must be part of every speech.

1. Audience Awareness.

The better you know the people in the seat, the better your presentation will be. Too many speakers are self-centered. They design a message that sounds good to them.

The audience-centered speaker provides what the people need. Information to help them grow. Motivation to aid the desire to apply.

2. Positive Preparation

Do not prepare in fear. Forget worrying about the possibilities of what can go wrong. Instead, think about the positives. Note everything you can’t wait to share. Pinpoint the most powerful aspects of the speech and look forward to releasing them.

3. Confident Content.

Too often we draw our confidence from our delivery style. Listen, that’s overrated. Who cares if an audience is wowed by delivery if no content comes with it?

The less confident you are with your delivery the more critical it is that you are confident with your content. Know exactly the benefit the audience will receive from the information you share.

4. Test Technology.

Check the microphones, laptop, etc. before the event. Inspect it with enough time to repair it if needed.

Last Wednesday I spoke at a meeting and we were not sure if my laptop would be compatible with the projection system. In the end we switched cables and all went well. But if I hadn’t been there forty-five minutes early it might not have went as well.

5. Validate Value

This ties the previous four points together.

Value the audience. Remember that you are talking to people with fears and also with dreams.

Value preparation. Don’t try to wing-it and don’t over prepare thinking it will make you perfect.

Value content. Have a clear message that cannot me missed. Also, make it practical so it can be immediately applied.

Value technology. If PowerPoint strengthens the message use it; if it doesn’t then don’t. Only use technology that will enhance the message.

If you know those four areas the fifth – validate value – will be guaranteed. You will know what you are going to say, who you are saying it to, and why you are sharing it.

Paul Evans is the author of six books, a professional speaker, and the creator of The Perfect Presentation. Paul has coached over 35,000 speakers of all levels.

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Common Language

 

You get super close to your audience when you speak the same language. A language that may almost seem foreign to those not in the circle.

Fitness for example. I used to own a gym and we’d talk about…

  • Reps
  • Sets
  • Getting ripped to the gills
  • High intensity
  • Forced reps
  • Drop sets

 

Or with online business…

  • Autoresponder
  • PHP
  • Upsells
  • Analytics
  • Plugins

 

What’s the language of your audience?

If you don’t know then….

#1 Buy Their Magazines

Mags are current and relevant. The latest jargon and idioms are used.

#2 Read Their Books

Yes, this take more time, but you get to the heart of the audience. Magazines are great from a surface point of view. Books are great to increase depth perception.

#3 Listen to Their Speakers

These should be people from within the industry. Folks who possibly create the language.

#4 Join the Masses

I feel it’s easiest to write and speak to people I have a bond with. It’s much easier for me to speak to a business group than a physicians group. Business is where I spend my time. Where I invest my money and energy. So naturally it’s the place I feel most connected.

When I speak to a group of business owners I do so as a fellow owner – not simply as an employed speaker. I know the language and can speak it naturally.

When I share stories, examples and points using common language the audience gets that “he’s talking just to me” feeling. Which is the goal of this entire series, right?

Warning: Don’t just pull some terms and slide them in. You’ll come across as fake and insincere. Make your use of language as organic as possible and you will know you’re audience and they will know you.

public speaking

Universal Stories

We’re more alike than you think – you and me…

I watched cartoons as a kid on Saturday mornings – how about you?

I remember climbing trees and my mom begging me to come down and bring a switch with me! How about you?

I remember opening the cereal box from the bottom to get the prize – how about you?

I remember my grandfather taking me fishing – how about you?

While those may not be exactly what you have experienced I bet you had a trigger or a link to a memory.

That’s the power of a universal story.

Shared “like” memories that help people feel connected.

We engage our audience at a deep level when they feel we are similar. And since we’re all human we are.

The posts, podcasts and presentations we dislike the most are often those where the person comes across as superior. Mom always said, “Nobody likes a know it all.”

In my experience, there are five ways to create a common bond through universal stories:

#1 Childhood

Hey! We were all kids once. And most kids were the same…

Playing with toys.
Riding bikes.
Watching cartoons.
Fantasy worlds.

Children are innocent. Fun. Precocious. Honest. Alive.

Stories from childhood deliver warmth and security.

#2 Holidays

Fireworks on the 4th.
Thanksgiving turkey gone bad.
And everyone seems to have a Cousin Eddie at Christmas.
Or how about the family trip to Disney.

You might think Disney doesn’t count since everyone has not been. But people are familiar with the images. They feel the fun even if they have not been there personally.

We’re not just tapping into common experiences; we’re tapping into the memory bank even if it was created from movies, photos or even Facebook.

#3 Food

In the first article in this series, Know Your Audience, I hit burgers, pizza, bacon. I could easily talk about peanut butter and jelly as a kid and most people would immediately click with that.

Also, what about strange “delicacies” only your grandmother made? Almost every family has some odd or special meal they eat together. Again, the story doesn’t not have to be identical, just universal.

And since all of us EAT… guess what? Food stories bring smiles and a watering mouth!

#4 Loss

This one is tough and you have to be careful.

When I talk about the passing away of my first wife, Sherri, people feel it. They connect with the emotion of loss. Almost all of us have been touched by death. It hurts. It’s painful.

When we tell stories of success everyone cannot relate. When we tell stories of loss everyone can. Suffering is a universal thread in humanity.

Take care when you share. Everyone wants to see the wreck – no one wants to see the blood. Remember that your audience is not your therapist. Your goal is to tell a connective story, not to solicit sympathy.

#5 Self-deprecating humor

I use a lot of short jokes since I am 5.5.5., or 65.5 inches. In three generations… my grandfather, mom and myself – none of us have ever seen over the top of a steering wheel!

As long as the humor doesn’t come across as insecurity, you can build massive good will and connection. No one laughs with an enemy and when people are laughing WITH you, you end up with a room full of friends. You get an audience who feels like they know you and you know them.

What universal stories do you currently tell? What new stories do you have? Take the five experiences above and list at least 3 stories beneath each one.

public speaking

Public Speaking : 25 Instant Confidence Boosters Part 1

25 Instant Confidence Boosters

Sometimes you don’t have time for a long formula or to sit down and work through a process.  There are times where you need confidence fast, instant confidence.  Here are 5 of 25 ways to get an instant boost of confidence.

1.  Compliments

Be on the listen out, not just look out, but listen out for compliments.  When people tell you that you look good or you dressed well or did you lose weight, instead of shrugging it off like we all tend to do, absorb those, listen to those and go “Wow, he is picking up on something here” and allow that to get in your head.

We’re so scared of arrogance, that we put a block on all our compliments.  Don’t do that.  Absorb them to give you a quick boost.  Go ahead and file those mentally and when you’re not feeling good about yourself, or  you don’t think you speak well, then think back to when someone said something positive about you and replay it.

2.  Successes

Log all your successes.  You need to write them down.

When you told a joke and it went wild and everybody loved it, remember that.  That’s what I do: I try to remember anytime anything seemed to go perfectly.  When the punch line came out perfectly or more people than usual wept at the sad story.  I remember all of that and when I’m feeling, “Well, I don’t know if that story is really that good or if I need to use it again?”  I’ll think about the audience reaction.

Or if I think, “You know, is that joke really funny?” I’ll think about the audience reaction.

Even entire speeches. If I’m invited with, “We want you to do your speech about your first wife’s death.  Will you come and do that?”  And I’m thinking, “I’ve done that so many times.”  I will think about the successes. I’ll think about the value that ten of thousands have received from that message.

You need to do the same thing.  Write down your successes, log those mentally and replay them when you need a quick boost of confidence.

3.  Failure

That’s right, failure can actually boost your confidence because it is so beneficial to fail and determine what needs to change.

In the book, “If You Want To Walk On Water, You’ve Got To Get Out Of The Boat” John Ortberg sites a study of pottery students. To one section of the class they said, “You have got to make this pot perfectly.  You get one chance.”

To another side of the class they said, “You get to make a pot. You get to fail as many times as you want, but you don’t have to make a perfect pot.  You just make a pot.”

One side had to make the perfect one, the other side got to fail as many times as it wanted and just make a pot.  At the end of the process, the side that got to fail was the side that had the most perfect pots.  We think we’ve got to do everything perfectly the first time in order to succeed.  We don’t have to.  Failure is so beneficial as long as you don’t allow it to overwhelm you.

So think back on some of your failures and vow, “I’m not going to do that again.”  And gain confidence, let it boost you because you know what not to do. Without failure to learn from none of use would become better.

4.  Your Abilities

What are your abilities?  What are your skills, things that you’ve been trained to do?

I talk to people all the time who say, “You know, I really hate my job. I’d like to quit, but I don’t know what I would do.”  There are so many things that people can do, things they’ve been trained for.

What have you got within you that you can do that is beneficial to other people? Even beyond that, things that you enjoy doing?  That will give you an instant boost of confidence because you can look at yourself and say, “You know, I really am good at __________.”

5.  Talent

I look at this a little bit different than abilities because an ability is something we’re all going to have to be trained in. Whereas a talent comes naturally.  I’m into talent because I like ease.  The easier it is the more I’ll do it.

What are your talents?  What has come naturally to you all your life?  Has speaking been natural?  Has drawing been natural?  Being humorous?  Being serious?  Being contemplative?  Those are talents that you’ve been given or that you were born with, or however you want to state it, I don’t care, but you can’t really take credit for, it’s just something that is within you.

Remember those in times when you feel insecure or you feel overwhelmed.  Replay some of your talents and say, “I’ve got real talent.  I know I can ________”  It’s something that doesn’t come and go, it’s there all the time.

Success is NOT an Accident,

Paul

Get All 25 Confidence Boosters in Speak Strong!

Know Your Audience

People who know me don’t have a hard time gifting me…

  • 5 Guys Burgers and Fries
  • Pizza
  • Bacon
  • Coke Zero
  • Books

Pretty basic. Simple. Yet specific.

But when you don’t know someone, you gift generically. You go broad. Gift cards to places like Target. Because just about everyone can find something they like at a store like that one.

To engage your audience you have to know your audience. If you don’t, you…

  • Write broad.
  • Speak in generalities.
  • Hope to connect.

When you KNOW, then your people get the “it feels like he’s writing/speaking just to me.”

So how do we get there? How do you get to know someone?

1. You share “universal” stories.

2. You eat together (and you do not have to like the same food).

3. You hang out.

4. You tell secrets and even dark truths.

5. You speak a common language.

We’ll cover each of those in coming articles and podcasts.

For now – think about your audience. The people you write to. The people you record for. The people you present to. What are their lives like? What are they hoping you will do for them? What are their hopes, their dreams, their struggles?

public speaking

Public Speaking Criticism

Everyone will NOT like you as a speaker (or as a person for that matter).

That may be the #1 thing you need to know to get over the fear of public speaking.

Most public speakers allow the minority to cripple them with fear. They worry about the ONE who won’t like the speech, or laugh at the joke, or won’t like. You get the idea.

First, remember the 2/2/96 rule.

2% will think you are the best ever. 2% will hate you. Shoot for the 96%.

You do not NEED to be liked by everyone. Everyone does not like country music, or rap, or classical. But do artist shut down because some don’t like them? Nope. Only when the majority doesn’t like them is there a problem.

Second, remember the jealousy factor.

The people who make snide remarks or try to “help” you are usually jealous.

They want the spotlight and the only way they can feed their pride is by being negative to you.

Third, concentrate on the positive comments.

Forget about the one or two negative comments and focus on the words that build. We all have a natural inclination to remember the worst. Focus on the best!

On average 2% will approach you after a speech with some “constructive” criticism. From experience I can tell you that the typical speaker takes the criticism to heart. They replay it over and over. They allow it to defeat them.

You cannot worry about the 2%

Let me give you an example from the last email letter I sent to you. This may not be a live speech example, but the principle is the same.

I mentioned that my son was giving a speech and wanted to say something funny. Then I recommended this resource for others who want to become funnier.

Many bought Brad’s humor package and have been extremely thankful. Out of thousands of emails sent I got one negative. I reprinted it here UNEDITED….

“Using your son to try to suck me into buying some other guys supposed humour, I don’t thik that;s funny at all, maybe idiotic is a better word, you fool, now I’, laughing”

I understand WHY it might have bothered this person, but I can’t let that bother me. Why? Two reasons.

First, it’s one person. I knew before sending the email that some would not like it. If you are going to let a handful of people control you, then get out of public speaking right now.

Second, look at the words used: “idiotic,” “fool.” “I’ laughing.” Here’s a lesson for you. Assuming you didn’t say or do anything wrong, remember this: The stronger the language the person uses the more you should ignore it.

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Lesson 1: You cannot let what someone MIGHT think bother you.
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Everyone will not like your speech. No big deal. Don’t root your words in worry or fear. Instead, anchor them in the value you are going to deliver to the audience. Plan your presentation with the knowledge that you will be helping listeners.

Spending your time imagining the worse only drains you of the energy that should go into your presentation. Forget about dreaming up the worst, dream about the best. Think about the wonderful comments or congratulations you will receive.

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Lesson 2: You cannot let unsolicited negative feedback bother you.
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This is my favorite advice from Alan Weiss on unsolicited feedback.

Here’s another “boundary” issue. When speaking for the Washington DC National Speakers Association Chapter last Saturday, a woman approached me at break to tell me that, while I was a terrific speaker, “all professional women in the audience found my remarks about my wife and daughter demeaning” (I had been kidding that they were awaiting me in New York spending money on my daughter’s bridal shower). She hadn’t taken a poll, of course, so she must have been channeling all those people otherwise on their feet and applauding.

She told me not to respond, but to reflect. I told her I wouldn’t reflect but would respond, and that I had had it with the presumptuousness of people who kept their own box scores of whether I was positive or negative about women in their own, parochial and biased view. I told her to go join the pronoun police because I wasn’t interested in anything she had to say.

I believe, maliciously, she was trying to throw me off balance in the middle of my presentation. Instead, she energized me because I was able to tell her immediately that I’d have none of it.

Unsolicited feedback is ALWAYS for the sender, and ranges from innocently vacuous to malignantly evil. Don’t let the energy suckers prevail.

Most of us would not be so firm or direct. Most would take the verbal beating with grace. Alan proves you can be articulate while refusing to be a punching bag for another’s agenda.

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Lesson 3: Remember the Goal.
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The goal is to communicate in a way to help others. We do not (or should not) speak for applause or accolades. The speaker who craves acceptance is the same one who is injured by the minority with the negative comments.

When your goal is to give the listeners the best you have for THEIR benefit, then feedback isn’t important. How the audience takes and applies the message is what matters.

So do not be afraid of what other people might criticize you for. Concentrate on helping the audience reach their goals.

pbe-speakwithpassion

Bullseye Speaking

When the meeting or event is over what do you want the audience to leave with? What concept? What idea? What unforgettable belief? What new opinion? What information?

Your Purpose is the Bull’s-eye of the message, the target you want to hit. You may have noticed that a Bull’s-eye is part of my Evans Communication and Consulting logo. My tagline is “Bull’s-eye speaking . . . Zero Zzzzzzzzs Guaranteed.” You can tell I’m serious about the outcome of my presentations.

After you select your topic, and you know your audience, you’re ready to move into the formula for Bull’s-eye success.

Narrow Topic + Head + Heart = Bull’s-Eye Speaking

Narrow Topic

Make It Clear and Precise

The message needs to have pinpoint accuracy. General topics will have general outcomes. No one will know what you talked about. You can even tell a lot of jokes and get the crowd going, but if you don’t share something targeted they might leave saying, “Well that was entertaining, but I don’t have a clue what the message was about.”

Again, ask yourself what is the one thing you want your audience to leave with?

Throughout this book we’ll build a talk on goals. So let’s begin right now as we learn to narrow our topic.

First, “goals” is a broad topic. There’s too much information on the subject. You could speak for days on the various aspects.

Some goal ideas…

  • Goal setting
  • Goal attaining
  • Getting started
  • Long-term goals
  • Short-term goals
  • Lifelong goals

Any of those could be a speech. But even then they may not be narrow enough to create specific rather than general understanding of your subject.

You can narrow further by adding a narrowing phrase.

  • Goal setting for financial security
  • Goal attaining for self-esteem
  • Getting started—your first hour of goal planning
  • Long-term goals for a secure retirement
  • Short-term goals for becoming a vegetarian
  • Lifelong goals for physical health
  • Make your topic as tight as possible.

Head

What do you want the people to think?

Next determine how you want to affect your audience’s heads. What do you want to happen to them intellectually? How do you want to challenge them mentally?

Do you want to create awareness? Do you want to inform? Do you want to generate doubt?

Force the audience to think.

Heart

What do you want the audience to feel?

You want to impact their hearts. Do you want them to feel sad about the number of drunk driving accidents, or perhaps infuriated? Do you want the audience to feel joyful or electric after your talk? Maybe you want them to feel challenged, or uplifted, or light, or heavy?

Write down how you want them to feel after your talk.

For our goal speech here’s how I laid it out:

Narrow topic: Goal Achievement for Life

+

Head: “The audience should compare where they are to where they could be.”

+

Heart: “The audience should feel a belief in themselves and a hope for what can be accomplished.”

Your Purpose Defined…

Your narrow topic: ________________________________

+

Head: ______________________________

+

Heart: ____________________________________

 

Irrefutable Law of Speaking

Engage Your Audience Intellectually and Emotionally.

The first step in drawing people to your purpose is through your talk’s title. And we’ll talk about that in the next article.

Date: March 4, 2014
Time: 01:00-02:30 p.m.
Event: Free Public Speaking Webinar
Topic: ENGAGE
Registration: Click here to register.

You Are The One

The #1 excuse or fear I hear the most from speakers is, “Who am I to speak to this group of people? I’m nobody special.”

Ok, I know email is not the easiest way to pump you up and give you a motivational shot in the arm, but I’m going to give it my best.

First, you are the one to speak if you WANT to be.

Every professional speaker began at level none. But they did one thing: They decided. They decided to be the one. One daythey told themselves, “I am going to be an expert in…”

And they did it.

You can be an expert for a day if you want. Be THE ONE for the subject wherever you speak. Study it. Absorb it.

Make a decision that you will be THE ONE who should give the message of your heart…or the message you were assigned.

Second, you are unique.

There is no other you. Now then, that sounds like a cliché, but it’s not. The way you view life. The way you drink life. They way you engage life. The way you laugh life. The way you scream life. The way you dream life. The way you sip life. The way you smell life. No one does it like you.

The pros rely on their personal experiences to add credibility to their messages. What makes this acceptable is the fact that they deliver value through their lives.

You can too.

You have valuable experiences to share that can help others learn, stretch, and grow.

Let me tell you one of my many stories very briefly.

Seventeen years ago my wife died unexpectedly. She was twenty-seven. I was twenty-five. Our son, Sam, was only five weeks old. Her death occurred right in front of me.

Am I the first young husband and father to have such a tragedy? No. But MY experience can only be told by me.

I have taken that experience and shared it with thousands upon thousands. You would not believe all the ways this story can help people in a variety of businesses. Because of the great service I received from the funeral home and my life insurance company I can share what they did right with thousands of industries.

But that’s not all.

I can also share with organizations who want to teach their people to enjoy each moment and not take life for granted.

It would be easy to limit myself to one market, or one
topic. But I don’t have too.

You might be thinking. “Nothing like that has happened to me.” I hope not. But you don’t need a triumph or a tragedy to be the ONE, just be you!

Be YOUnique!

YOU are the one they asked to speak for the group.

YOU are the one with the message.

YOU are the one with the experiences.

YOU are the one who prepared.

YOU are the one who no one else is like.

YOU are the one who can deliver value only the way YOU can.

Paul Evans is the author of six books, a professional speaker, and the creator of Instant Speaking Success. Paul has coached over five-hundred speakers of all levels.

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It Doesn’t Take Much

I teach a bible class every Sunday morning at church. Rarely do I mention any of my work. In fact, the most asked question my family gets is…

“What exactly does Paul do?”

My refusal to get “labeled” has now labeled me an enigma. 🙂

However, yesterday in a class of about 100 we were talking about not letting criticizers get to you. (Some of what I covered in Public Speaking ADD.)

I mentioned that speakers have a hard time accepting criticism because they want 5 star reviews across the board. “Most of the speakers I train feel this way.”

That’s all I said about training speakers.

Yet two people came up after class and asked if I would coach them.

It doesn’t take much to get booked, sell your products, etc.

All you have to do is mention what you do.

If I had mentioned that I design websites I would have had 2-3 people come up and ask about that too.

Tell people you’re a speaker. They’ll ask what you speak about. If it fits a need they’ll give you an invitation.

It doesn’t take much.

Speak with Passion or Just Leave Me a Note,

Paul

The Ultimate Outcome

The Ultimate Outcome

When the meeting or event is over what do you want the audience to leave with? What concept? What idea? What unforgettable belief? What new opinion? What information?

Your Purpose is the Bull’s-eye of the message, the target you want to hit. You may have noticed that a Bull’s-eye is part  of my symbol. My tagline is “Bull’s-eye speaking . . .  Zero Zzzzzzzzs Guaranteed.” You can tell I’m serious about the outcome of my presentations.

After you select your topic, and you know your audience, you’re ready to move into the formula for Bull’s-eye success.

Narrow Topic + Head + Heart = Bull’s-Eye Speaking

Narrow Topic

Make It Clear and Precise

The message needs to have pinpoint accuracy. General topics will have general outcomes. No one will know what you talked about. You can even tell a lot of jokes and get the crowd going, but if you don’t share something targeted they might leave saying, “Well that was entertaining, but I don’t have a clue what the message was about.”

Again, ask yourself what is the one thing you want your audience to leave with?

Throughout this book we’ll build a talk on goals. So let’s begin right now as we learn to narrow our topic.

First, “goals” is a broad topic. There’s too much information on the subject. You could speak for days on the various aspects.

Some goal ideas…

  • Goal setting
  • Goal attaining
  • Getting started
  • Long-term goals
  • Short-term goals
  • Lifelong goals

Any of those could be a speech. But even then they may not be narrow enough to create specific rather than general understanding of your subject.

You can narrow further by adding a narrowing phrase.

  • Goal setting for financial security
  • Goal attaining for self-esteem
  • Getting started—your first hour of goal planning
  • Long-term goals for a secure retirement
  • Short-term goals for becoming a vegetarian
  • Lifelong goals for physical health
  • Make your topic as tight as possible.

Head

What do you want the people to think?

Next determine how you want to affect your audience’s heads. What do you want to happen to them intellectually? How do you want to challenge them mentally?

Do you want to create awareness? Do you want to inform? Do you want to generate doubt?

Force the audience to think.

Heart

What do you want the audience to feel?

You want to impact their hearts. Do you want them to feel sad about the number of drunk driving accidents, or perhaps infuriated? Do you want the audience to feel joyful or electric after your talk? Maybe you want them to feel challenged, or uplifted, or light, or heavy?

Write down how you want them to feel after your talk.

For our goal speech here’s how I laid it out:

Narrow topic: Goal Achievement for Life

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Head: “The audience should compare where they are to where they could be.”

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Heart: “The audience should feel a belief in themselves and a hope for what can be accomplished.”

Your Purpose Defined…

Your narrow topic: ____________________________________________

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Head: _______________________________________________________

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Heart: _______________________________________________________

 

Irrefutable Law of Speaking

Engage Your Audience Intellectually and Emotionally.

The first step in drawing people to your purpose is through your talk’s title.

pbe-speakwithpassion

Words

public speaking

Words create, command, and convince.

Simple words such as “Would you like a cup of coffee?” cause an effect. Seconds before, coffee wasn’t on the agenda. Suddenly there’s the smell. The taste. The warmth. All from words. And a simple “Yes” will produce a cup just like you like it from the hand of another.

Powerful words such as “I have a dream!” stir a nation. Inspire. Challenge. Convict. Connect.

Words possess the greatest power ever known or ever to be invented.

Words become flesh.

pbe-speakwithpassion